EIGHTIES ONWARDS

Abused

Stuffed toys, dolls especially, lend themselves to invisibility. When you look at a doll you don’t notice its particularities. Rather you see them as ‘human’ in a general way. If there are enough suitable cues; head, body, legs etc., you project humanness into them...The figure can be stripped down almost to a simple bag shape and still be accepted as  portraying a human being. All other qualities are filled  in by the viewer, and it is this projection that allows us to empathize with the doll. If on the other hand you were to see the doll as an exact model of a figure, as a portrait statue, they would be impossible to empathize with, imagine one of these walking down the street - it would be seen as a monstrosity.

Kelley

In a strange and disconcerting way Rilke’s  doll seems to share an inhuman space with the figure of the angel. The angel is the idealized pure form of Eros prior to organic involvement and differentiation  into sexes... While the angel is the  ideal unattainable achievement of perfect being, the doll is the grim threat of non-being.. Both can paralyze the imagination: the angel by luring the soul into dreams of paradise, and by revealing our human fallibility, insufficiency and ultimate dependence on the material world; the doll by inspiring a petrifying fear of death and meaninglessness.

Simms

Jarkovjakove

Acconci

Faucon

Dean

Smith

McCarthy x 3

Zwack

Kelley

Kelley

Sherman x 3

Skoglund

Ray

Steinbach

Rosenquist x 3

Egglestone

Robinson

Rondinone

In Limbo

...(he/she) twists and turns the toy...From time to time, makes it restart its mechanical motions, sometimes in the opposite direction. Its marvellous life comes to a stop. The child makes  a supreme effort; at last he opens it up...But where is the soul?

Baudelaire

1. Twenties     2. Thirties      3 Forties to Seventies     4. Eighties onwards       5. Japan     6. Barbie      7. 4 Feminine views          livepage.apple.com

Bread and Roses../Site_7/Bread_+_Roses.html